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Full text of "Shapes of clay (Mar. 1930)"

SHAPES 
OF CLAY 




MARCH' 1930 



PUBLISHED BY 

GLADDING, McBEAN & CO. 



CALIFORNIA 

STATE LIBRARY 



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1 




RICHFIELD OIL BUILDING, LOS ANGELES 

Black and gold and blue terra-cotta by Gladding, McBean 6? Co. 

Morgan, Walls & Clements, Architects 

P. J. Walker Company, Builders 



SHAPES OF CLAY 

Published Quarterly by Gladding, McBean 6? Co. 
General Office: 660 Market Street, San Francisco 

Edward F. O'Day, Editor 

*• •» 

Volume VI March, 1930 Number i 



o 



k IL is "black gold." And the service colors of the Richfield Oil 
Co. are blue and gold. For the Richfield Building of Los An- 
geles the architects, Morgan, Walls & Clements, selected a cov 
ering of terra-cotta that would suggest both ideas. This terra-cotta was 
burned in black and gold and blue. The gold has the glory of the gold' 
smith's leaf. Its background is a satiny black which the varying play of 
sunshine and night illumination changes to elusive purples and grays. A 
rich blue is occasionally used to neighbor the gold and tone its luster. 

The Pacific Coast had no precedent for this color scheme. The architects 
used the most painstaking care in working it out, chancing no failure, and 
testing the final result of their elaborate and exhaustive studies by means of 
a small model that showed the final colors in the exact scale of their dis' 
tribution over the four surfaces of the building. Meanwhile they had just as 
thoughtfully supervised the production of the selected colors in terra-cotta. 
The color experts, the ceramic artists, and the kiln masters of Gladding, 
McBean 6? Co. gave experience and understanding to this element of the 
problem. The accomplished fact is a combination of colors that dignifies 
and ennobles a magnificent architectural creation. 

Morgan, Walls 6? Clements conceived the Richfield Building in terms 
of that modernity which now controls the creative impulses of all our great 
western workers in art. Its central mass soars without pause to the height 



SHAPES OF CLAY 

limit of the Los Angeles building code. Thence the building springs upward 
again, and still again, in lesser flights, and finally pierces the higher sky with 
a graceful mast topped by the most powerful beacon in the country. 

May not this building be called, in tribute to its heavenward ascent, 
a cathedral of commerce? If the old architecture reached its zenith, as 
some critics hold, "in the breathless beauty of Amiens and Chartres," is 
not the new architecture, which is distinctively an American triumph, 
attaining its pinnacle of perfection in heaven-piercing structures like the 
Richfield Building? Bearing out this notion is the fancy of Mr. Harris 
Allen that its portal suggests "the stately doorway to some noble cathe' 
dral, but none that memory can identify." 

The alliance between architecture and sculpture was formed in the 
dawn of art. The terms of this alliance today may be studied profitably 
in the Richfield Building. Haig Patigian, sculptor of San Francisco, worked 
in intimate sympathy with the architects, and his human figures are part 
of the living organism of the structure. A series of figures symbolizing 
Motive Power tops the main mass on all four sides. Drawn up, as it were, 
in "hollow square" upon the ramparts, their immobile strength seems to 
protect the busy life within the walls. They are the guardian angels of 
this cathedral. For the main portal Patigian designed four other figures 
expressing Aviation, Postal Service, Industry and Navigation— the secular 
apostles of today. Poetically conceived, strongly modeled, all this sculp- 
ture exhibits Patigian at his best, a modernist who avers that classic 
beauty can never die. Executed, like their coordinated ornament, in gold' 
en terra-cotta, these sculptures demonstrate the perfect plasticity of the 
medium. They lost absolutely nothing of their vitality and expressiveness 
in the fire of the kiln. 




I. RICHFIELD OIL BUILDING, LOS ANGELES 

A shaft sped upward from the bow of creative art all Gladding, McBean 6? Co. terra' 

cotta black ashlar sculpture and ornament in gold. 

Morgan, Walls 6? Clements, Architects P. J. Walker Company, Builders 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/shapesofclaymar161unse 




II. RICHFIELD OIL BUILDING, LOS ANGELES 

In noble salute to the arch of heaven the architects dreamed a masterwork, our artists and 

craftsmen helped to shape the terra'COtta reality. 

Morgan, Walls & Clements, Architects P. J. Walker Company, Builders 




III. RICHFIELD OIL BUILDING, LOS ANGELES 

Out of our kilns emerged this "beauty that endureth forever" in everlasting terra-cotta the 

ashlar has innumerable shallow flutes for light and shadow to play on. 

Morgan, Walls & Clements, Architects P. J. Walker Company, Builders ■ 




IV. RICHFIELD OIL BUILDING, LOS ANGELES 

San Francisco's Haig Patigian produced the building's symphony 

of sculpture the portal figures illustrate his mighty 

music terra-cotta's plasticity proven indeed. 

Morgan, Walls 6? Clements, Architects 
P. J. Walker Company, Builders 




V. GARFIELD BUILDING, LOS ANGELES 

Modern business challenges the sky with beauty lit at the flame of architecture, the fire of 

our kilns transfigured clay into this loveliness of terra-cotta. 

Claud Beelman, Arcfutect H. M. Baruch Co., Contractor 




VI. GARFIELD BUILDING, LOS ANGELES 

Terra'Cotta as the entrancing handmaiden that lightens the burden of city work the 

color, a warm buff the texture, smooth. 

Claud Beelman, Architect H. M. Baruch Co., Contractor 




VII. GARFIELD BUILDING, LOS ANGELES 

Ornament that truly adorns because sewn with threads of imagination to the fabric of the building's 
dress our terra'cotta in rhythms of simplicity and richness. 

Claud Beelman, Architect H. M. Baruch Co., Contractor 




VIII. PACIFIC MUTUAL BUILDING, LOS ANGELES 

Tcrra'cotta of white enamel proving its economic superiority two bays were added on the 

court side older terra'cotta (cleaned) in perfect harmony with new. 

John 6? Donald B. Parkinson, Architects Scofield'Twaits Co., Contractor 




IX. CALIFORNIA BANK, BEVERLY HILLS BRANCH, CALIFORNIA 

A branch bank truly business is branching out in the City of Endless Wonders everywhere 

banks are showing partiality for terra'cotta's strength and perdurability our buff textured. 

John 6? Donald B. Parkinson, Architects Scofield-Twaits Co., Contractor 




X. UNITED SHOPPING TOWER, SEATTLE 

Concentrated radiance against night's black curtain terra-cotta is even more friendly 

to artificial than to natural light our black-spotted, cream enamel. 

Henry Bittman, Architect Henrikson-Alstrom Construction Co., Contractor 




XI. McKALE'S SERVICE STATION, SEATTLE 

Fine faste in blending our materials terra-cotta, white and cream pulsichrome, blue polychrome 

for background of frieze and cresting roof tile, Granada's variegated reds. 

Wm. R. Grant, Architect O. L. Niles, Contractor 




XII. EXETER APARTMENTS, SEATTLE 

Terra-cotta and brick conjoined to bid the dweller welcome a happy harmony the terra'cotta, 

our cream pulsichrome the brick, our Palmer smooth-finished. 

Stuart & Wheatley, Architects Harding F. Allan, Contractor 




XIII. PIMA COUNTY COURT HOUSE, TUCSON, ARIZONA 

Trees and a poem of architecture to glorify them dome, and lobby wainscot, our decorative 

tile roof, our varicolor Granada vast floors inside and out, our Palacio tile. 

Roy Place, Architect Herbert Brown, Contractor 




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XIV. PARRY RESIDENCE, HUNTINGTON PALISADES, LOS ANGELES 

Across the lawn to happiness and home" green carpet, blue sky, snowy walls and sweetly 

singing in this color-chorus, our Junipero roof tile with Cuban finish. 

Gable & Wyant, Architects 




XV. CALM RESIDENCE, HUNTINGTON PALISADES, LOS ANGELES 

Sweetly suggestive of the English shires in summer-time and clean-lined against the sky, 

this example of our Heavy English Shingle tile, "single laid." 

Frank A. Hellenthal, Architect 



GLADDING, McBEAN 6? CO. 

Founded 1875 

* 

San Francisco Office, 660 Market Street 

Los Angeles Office, 621 South Hope Street 

Seattle Office, 15:00 ist Avenue, S. Portland Office, 454 Everett Street 

Spokane Office, 1102 North Monroe Street 

Oakland Office, Twentysecond and Market Streets 

Fresno Office, San Joaquin Materials Co., 744 G Street 
* 

CLAY PRODUCTS 



Printid by TayUr & Taylor y San Francisco